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Analysis Story for October: Take Your Pick

Multibody simulation featuring a ball bearing with flexible outer race.

Scenario 1: Multibody simulation featuring a ball bearing with flexible outer race.

Scenario 2: Optimized blade shape of a wind turbine.

Scenario 2: Optimized blade shape of a wind turbine.

Scenario 3: Airflow around the wheels and inside the wheel wells of a motorcycle traveling at 250 mph.

Scenario 3: Airflow around the wheels and inside the wheel wells of a motorcycle traveling at 250 mph.

Scenario 4: CFD simulation of the air flow around a generic open wheel race car, from Richard at Symscape.

Scenario 4: CFD simulation of the airflow around a generic open wheel race car, from Richard at Symscape.

In May, I called on analysis software users to send me their explosive blockbuster clips, made without the help of Hollywood celebrities. The idea was to issue an open call for story pitches in the form of animated clips, the kind that you can easily export from a FEA (finite element analysis) or CFD (computational fluid dynamics) package after a simulation session. (I had to specify it to make sure I wasn’t flooded with a deluge of home videos showing household pets doing tricks.)

Here are the four that caught my eyes, presented in no particular order (click on the corresponding images to go to the video):

  1. Multibody simulation featuring a ball bearing with flexible outer race, from Brant at MotionPort.
  2. Optimized blade shape of a wind turbine, from Travis at The University of Texas.
  3. Airflow around the wheels and inside the wheel wells of a motorcycle traveling at 250 mph, from David at Design Dreams.
  4. CFD simulation of the air flow around a generic open wheel race car, from Richard at Symscape.

My heartfelt thanks to everyone who submitted clips! It’s now time to help me select one from these worthy four. Please leave a comment to tell me:

  • which one you’d like to see as the topic of my next article;
  • what more you’d like to know about this particular simulation.

If you’d rather email me directly with your choice, please send it to Kennethwongsf [at] earthlink.net.

I look forward to your input!

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About Kenneth

Kenneth Wong has been a regular contributor to the CAD industry press since 2000, first an an editor, later as a columnist and freelance writer for various publications. During his nine-year tenure, he has closely followed the migration from 2D to 3D, the growth of PLM (product lifecycle management), and the impact of globalization on manufacturing. His writings have appeared in Cadalyst, Computer Graphics World, and Manufacturing Business Technology, among others.

7 comments

  1. I don’t think you can lose with any of these. Since many CAD designers use bearings, this might be my first choice. On the other hand, I used to work for a tire company so the wheel related ones look good too.

    Maybe you should do four articles ;-)

  2. Those are all pretty cool. I’m blown away by what Richard submitted from Caedium, though. I guess I hadn’t seen what he’s done for post processing and had assumed it wouldn’t be so modern since Caedium is such an innexpensive tool, built on top of an open source solver.

    That last (run-on) sentence is a full story in itself that I’d love to read in DE.

  3. I have a little conflict of interest, but Travis from UT Arlington is a great young engineering who knows his stuff. But Rich’s work at Symscape, besides the open-source aspect that Jeff points out, looks really cool too. Sorry – I’m biased toward CFD!

  4. Decisions, decisions! I guess #1 for work but, #3 for my interests.

  5. I vote for the bearing analysis. It is a fundamental element of machine design and affects so many other downstream elements (gears, shafts, housings, etc.). I am very curious to know the details of the analysis. Was it done with an FEA package or with Romax? If done with an FEA package, I wonder how he was able to handle model stability and contacts with the balls.

  6. I am an old motorcycle racer from 70’s & 80’s.
    I used to race Dave’s bike in the mid-west.
    Yes I’m bias because Dave is my brother.
    He is about 25 years ahead of the times.
    In my experience with some well known motorheads, this could be a requirement for the future in aerodynamics for bikes and cars.
    Go Dave, I vote #3.

  7. Hello there, I really like your article, your authoring model is to the point and in case this is a true example of your style, I will be back!.

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