One Scene, Two Shots: Bunkspeed SHOT and Luxion KeyShot 2

How Bunkspeed HyperShot split into two rendering packages: Bunksped SHOT and Luxion KeyShot

How Bunkspeed HyperShot split into two rendering packages: Bunksped SHOT and Luxion KeyShot

The model of a porsche, rendered in Bunkspeed SHOT at 2400 x 1350 pixel, 164 frames.

The model of a Porsche, rendered in Bunkspeed SHOT at 2400 x 1350 pixel, 164 frames.

The model of a porsche, rendered in Luxion KeyShot 2 at 2400 x 1350 pixels, 164 frames.

The model of a Porsche, rendered in Luxion KeyShot 2 at 2400 x 1350 pixels, 164 frames.

Close up of the front view, rendered in Bunkspeed SHOT.

Close up of the tire and headlight, rendered in Bunkspeed SHOT.

Close up of the front view, rendered in Luxion KeyShot.

Close up of the tire and headlight, rendered in Luxion KeyShot.

Close up of the front view, rendered in Bunkspeed SHOT.

Close up of the front view, rendered in Bunkspeed SHOT.

Close up of the front view, rendered in Luxion KeyShot 2.

Close up of the front view, rendered in Luxion KeyShot 2.

Left: Material grouping options at import in Bunkspeed SHOT; (right) material grouping options at import in Luxion KeyShot.

Left: Part grouping options at import in Bunkspeed SHOT; (right) part grouping options at import in Luxion KeyShot.

In Bunkspeed SHOT, the model tree lets you preview selected objects as thumbnail shapes. The objec selected is also highlighted in a (faint blue) outline in the scene window.

In Bunkspeed SHOT, the model tree lets you preview selected objects as thumbnail shapes. The selection is also highlighted in the scene window (in a faint blue outline).

Luxion Keyshot also provides a scene tree, but doesn't offer preview of selected objects.

Luxion Keyshot also provides a scene tree, but doesn't offer preview of selected objects.

In Luxion KeyShot, you can turn any material into emissive (or illuminated) material.

In Luxion KeyShot, you can turn any material into emissive (or illuminated) material.

Bunkspeed SHOT: (top) Single-click button to turn on or off ray tracing; (middle) grouping options at import; (bottom) Ray Brush for cpncentrated

Bunkspeed SHOT: (top) Single-click button to turn on or off ray tracing; (middle) drop-down menu with camera aspect ratios; (bottom) Ray Brush for magnified, partial preview.

What I like in Bunkspeed SHOT

  • Drag handles to move and reposition model
  • Easy way to capture screenshots
  • Ray Brush, for previewing select regions in magnified, high-res setup
  • Single-click button to turn on or turn off ray tracing
  • More material and object grouping options at import
  • Model tree to navigate scene (with highlights to isolate and view selected objects)
  • Option to specify camera type and aspect ratio
  • GPU support

What I like in Luxion KeyShot

  • Drag handles to move and reposition model
  • Easy way to capture screenshots
  • Model tree to navigate scene (without highlights to isolate and view selected objects)
  • Easy way to turn any material into emissive (illuminated) material
  • Mac support

Where I feel both packages can use some improvement

  • Adding and editing new light source to scene
  • Positioning decal

Determining factors

  • Bunkspeed SHOT uses a hybrid CPU-GPU rendering method, so if you’re using a machine with a powerful GPU, you may get better performance (speedier rendering) in Bunkspeed SHOT.
  • Bunkspeed SHOT offers a few interface elements (like Ray Brush and camera aspect-ratio controls) not found in Luxion KeyShot.
  • Luxion KeyShot retains the look and feel of HyperShot, so if you’re looking for a familiar look and feel, you’ll probably find Luxion KeyShot more appealing.
  • Bunkspeed SHOT is currently available only for Windows OS.
  • Luxion KeyShot is available for both Windows and Mac.
  • Bunkspeed SHOT standard is priced $995. Pro version’s price is unpublished.
  • Luxion KeyShot 2 standard is $995. KeyShot Pro 2 is $1,995.
  • Luxion offers HyperShot owners the option to upgrade to KeyShot (price starting at $395)
  • Bunkspeed plans to give a license of Bunkspeed SHOT to every HyperShot owner. Those who bought the $200 Web version of HyperShot may be required to pay an upgrade fee.

Notes

Bunkspeed SHOT saves scenes as .bif files; Luxion KeyShot saves them as .bip files. They are not interchangeable (you cannot open scenes saved in Bunkspeed SHOT in Luxion KeyShot, nor can you do the reverse).

A review of Bunkspeed SHOT is published here.

For more images rendered in Bunkspeed SHOT, visit DE Exchange photo album here.

A review of Luxion KeyShot is published here.

For more images rendered in Luxion KeyShot, visit DE Exchange photo album here.

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12 Responses to One Scene, Two Shots: Bunkspeed SHOT and Luxion KeyShot 2

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  • Peter McMillan says:

    Ok, so is this a fair comparision?

    No.

    You use deep metallic gold for the paint and bright alloy for the rims for Bunkspeed Shot… Which looks blingy and good.

    Then to “COMPARE” you render the same scene with Keyshot, but use different and far more boring materials, that is, Gloss red (NON-Metallic) paint for the car paint, and gloss black (anodise or paint?) for the wheels.

    The inability to fairly compare between the two render packages in terms of lighting, chadowing and reflections because of the different materials is so blatant, you may as well have rendered the Keyshot image with no illumination whatsoever.

    The gloss red material looks Matte from a normal incidence and gloss with some angle, this is obviously a tweaked material and it looks far poorer than the packages capability.

    Why did you do this? Any real 3D user should see that this review is only useful for your comparisons regading the software gui and workflow.

    I do prefer Bunkspeed, but this review is very biased towards it.

    Peter.

  • Kenneth says:

    Peter: Thanks for the input!

    I just chose two default materials that came with the software. I chose two different colors so people could tell them apart easily. I didn’t think the shiny gold color tips the scale in favor of Bunkspeed, because I thought the red Porsche looks just as impressive. But I see your point. To untrained eyes, the glittering gold may looks more impressive.

    To be honest, I can’t tell which package produces better rendering results. Please do share with us the reasons you prefer Bunkspeed over KeyShot. Is that based on the rendering results or based on the user interface?

  • Bruce says:

    Current owners of HyperShot will get Shot standard for free. You can get KeyShot V1 for free, but not version 2.

  • Kenneth says:

    PS: Peter, I didn’t tweak the material in KeyShot. I just dropped it in as it came. If you happen to have KeyShot and would like to render the same scene, I’d be glad to give you the Porsche model and the HDRI backdrop I used. I’d be interested in looking at your rendering results and, with your permission, post it here.

  • Bruce says:

    Also, I tried a comparison between the two using the same materials, environment, and background as well. Results can be seen here:

    http://bunkspeedshotbeta.hyperboards.com/index.php?action=view_topic&topic_id=252

  • Kenneth says:

    Bruce: I’d love to see the results, but your post seems to be in a protected area where only Bunkspeed forum users can access it. Would you be willing to email me the results, along with the specs of the machine you used? I’d love to publish it here with your permission.

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  • nick says:

    I share peters opinion,

    would like to try rendering your Porsche model with the HDRI backdrop you used in keyshot.

  • Lee says:

    Thanks for the article and the work that you put into this. I think it shows pretty clearly how the materials act and pick up the environment. Showing each package right out of the box makes sense to me. I want to see what each starts from, so thank you for that.

    I have not tried Luxion but I am getting all I want from Shot, and loved Hypershot too.

    Gaaawd some rude comments here…

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